Click here to support Maranda Elizabeth & Writing Trans Genres by Maranda Elizabeth

"Maranda Elizabeth is a writer, zinester, non-binary trans* genderqueerdo femme, twin, and recovering alcoholic. In 2012, they released their first book, Telegram: A Collection of 27 Issues, with Mend My Dress Press, and in 2013, they self-published their first novel,Ragdoll HouseTelegram: A Collection of 27 Issues contains a decade of their zine of the same name, featuring extremely personal stories with a focus on mental health & illnesses, friendship, self-care, support, writing and creativity, recovery and sobriety, finding and making a home, and embracing weirdnesses. Ragdoll House is a queer young adult novel about two girls in a small town deciding if they should stay or if they should leave, while struggling with alcohol, jealousy, trauma, and love…

The Writing Trans Genres: Emergent Literatures and Criticism Conference is happening in Winnipeg, Manitoba from May 22nd - 24th, and I wanna go! Due to my chronic pain condition, I’m no longer able to go on long-disatnce road trips, so flying has become my only option. I need help getting my little tattooed hands on a plane ticket and hotel room!

Attending the Writing Trans Genres conference would be pretty much unspeakably incredible & magical & necessary for myself and my writing process - and thus, for YOU, my readers, too! Although I’ve been writing for more than a decade, I’ve very rarely had the chance to do so in a space (whether physical or psychic) that was trans*-created & trans*-dominated. My writing has been influenced by a cis gaze and by own internalized gender-stuff, in a way that I must escape, if only briefly…

For those of you who’ve been asking me, or asking other trans* folks what actions you can take to be a better ally and to push back against cis privilege, this is just one (of many!!!) ideas & options: Help one trans* person make their way to a trans* gathering! I think it’s crucial for us to be able to create spaces together where we can learn, share, cry, laugh, whatever; unfortunately, it’s not always possible to make this magic happen, it’s not always possible to be present.”

If you can, consider donating to Maranda’s fundraiser to get to the Writing Trans Genres conference! There are some REALLY rad prizes!

3 months ago 11 notes URL
  Tags maranda elizabeth zines zinesters diy telegram


alexwrekk:

Marya is a rad lady who is starting
The Pamphleteer Project 
and you should help her out:

HI! MY NAME IS MARYA— I’m the founder of ABQ Zine Fest, (now in its 4th year) The Albuquerque Zine Library, and a co-founder/curator of The Tannex, a DIY performance clubhouse, in this outpost, in the high desert of New Mexico. I love my creative community, and I do a lot to support and nurture it. I’m asking for your support as I embark on a new project that expands my love for zines, self-publishing, and storytelling …
THE PAMPHLETEER PROJECT MISSION: to help diversify existing zine collections, or help establish new ones by presenting women/feminist focused, people of color influenced, gender-inclusive zines and comics to groups and collectives around the world.
YOUR CONTRIBUTION TO THE PAMPHLETEER PROJECTwill help me get to Sweden to present a pop-up zine library and free workshops at the TITWRENCH Stockholm Festival— a women’s music festival. The fest was founded in Denver by Sarah Slater in 2008. TITWRENCH Stockholm is the first satellite of the original fest. After the event, I will donate 100-200 zines to a collective in the city. 
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
YOUR GENEROUS FINANCIAL SUPPORT will:
Cover airfare to Stockholm.
Pay for simple materials to set up the zine library. 
If we surpass the goal of $2,500, this will allow me to take this pilot program and expand its reach to other collectives within the punk/zine community and beyond. Someday, I imagine this project being able to support other zinesters interested in delivering zines to groups and communities.
……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
WHY STOCKHOLM?
To spite our perceptions of Sweden being a utopia, The country is more diverse than the media reflects. Along with the changes to this nation comes unrest. Last year, Stockholm experienced 5 days of rioting.  On March 8th of this year, an act of fascism in the form of a knife attack occurred on the night of International Women’s Day, injuring several women taking part in a Reclaim the Night demonstration. These are acts of violence, but they are also acts of ignorance. The Pamphleteer Project supports the independent voice by presenting diversity as a means of and solidarity with local communities striving for peace through mutual acceptance. 
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
WHY ZINES?
I know zines to be a form that can open pathways to self-expression when other avenues are blocked, guide people through difficult conversations, and fuel strong political actions in communities through the power of the independent voice. Most importantly, zines can connect us to the human intimacy of storytelling.
……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
OTHER WAYS YOU CAN HELP:
+ Due to time constraints, and optimum ticket-buying, please donate to the project via paypal. I know, I know… your donation via credit card is also appreciated!  
+ If you can’t contribute $$ please donate ZINES that fit the criteria mentioned in the project description. Please email me at thepamphleteerproject at gmail dot com to find out where to submit your zine! 
THANK YOU!



GO AND SUPPORT THE PAMPHELETEER PROJECT!

alexwrekk:

Marya is a rad lady who is starting

The Pamphleteer Project

and you should help her out:

HI! MY NAME IS MARYA— I’m the founder of ABQ Zine Fest, (now in its 4th year) The Albuquerque Zine Library, and a co-founder/curator of The Tannex, a DIY performance clubhouse, in this outpost, in the high desert of New Mexico. I love my creative community, and I do a lot to support and nurture it. I’m asking for your support as I embark on a new project that expands my love for zines, self-publishing, and storytelling …

THE PAMPHLETEER PROJECT MISSION: to help diversify existing zine collections, or help establish new ones by presenting women/feminist focused, people of color influenced, gender-inclusive zines and comics to groups and collectives around the world.

YOUR CONTRIBUTION TO THE PAMPHLETEER PROJECTwill help me get to Sweden to present a pop-up zine library and free workshops at the TITWRENCH Stockholm Festival— a women’s music festival. The fest was founded in Denver by Sarah Slater in 2008. TITWRENCH Stockholm is the first satellite of the original fest. After the event, I will donate 100-200 zines to a collective in the city. 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

YOUR GENEROUS FINANCIAL SUPPORT will:

  • Cover airfare to Stockholm.
  • Pay for simple materials to set up the zine library. 
If we surpass the goal of $2,500, this will allow me to take this pilot program and expand its reach to other collectives within the punk/zine community and beyond. Someday, I imagine this project being able to support other zinesters interested in delivering zines to groups and communities.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

WHY STOCKHOLM?

To spite our perceptions of Sweden being a utopia, The country is more diverse than the media reflects. Along with the changes to this nation comes unrest. Last year, Stockholm experienced 5 days of rioting.  On March 8th of this year, an act of fascism in the form of a knife attack occurred on the night of International Women’s Day, injuring several women taking part in a Reclaim the Night demonstration. These are acts of violence, but they are also acts of ignorance. The Pamphleteer Project supports the independent voice by presenting diversity as a means of and solidarity with local communities striving for peace through mutual acceptance. 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

WHY ZINES?

I know zines to be a form that can open pathways to self-expression when other avenues are blocked, guide people through difficult conversations, and fuel strong political actions in communities through the power of the independent voice. Most importantly, zines can connect us to the human intimacy of storytelling.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

OTHER WAYS YOU CAN HELP:

+ Due to time constraints, and optimum ticket-buying, please donate to the project via paypal. I know, I know… your donation via credit card is also appreciated!  

+ If you can’t contribute $$ please donate ZINES that fit the criteria mentioned in the project description. Please email me at thepamphleteerproject at gmail dot com to find out where to submit your zine! 

THANK YOU!

GO AND SUPPORT THE PAMPHELETEER PROJECT!

(via quieroamartellorona)

3 months ago 97 notes URL
  Tags zines zinesters diy marya errin jones the pamphleteer project


Palette Magazine interviewed some of this year’s tablers at LA Zine Fest 2014, and here’s what they had to say!

Q: How is this fest different from something like Comic Con?

John Pham – The differences are pretty obvious. You can start at the choice of venue: LA Zine Fest this year was held in a repurposed parking structure; we were setting up tables on top of parking dividers and motor oil stains. LA Zine Fest is the local farmers’ market, San Diego Comic Con is the WTO Ministerial Conference.

Alisa Yang – LA Zine Fest allows more alternative and independent small press and self publishers, the eclectic variety is unmatched by big mainstream fests. Free admission is great for encouraging people to visit, the cost for table/booth is way more affordable than Comic Con or APE(Alternative Press Expo). You are more likely to find zines that are handmade, unusual, limited editions, or just beautiful works of art.

Jennie Yim – LAZF is focused on artists/writers who self-publish whereas Comic Con is focused on franchises/brands with mass market appeal. Pretty much anyone can exhibit and sell at LAZF and this is facilitated by the inexpensive tabling fees, proximity to mass transportation and core of dedicated volunteer staff. There is so much good will and solidarity based on the common goal everyone has of having a safe space for people of all backgrounds to share their experiences, tell their stories.

Jeremy Arambulo – I preferred it way more than Comic Con. Independent creators/companies tend to get overshadowed by Comic Con’s larger spectacles/events.

Read the rest on Palette’s website!

4 months ago 6 notes URL
  Tags la zine fest zines zinesters comics diy


Found in the flickr pool….

By remembernostalgia

4 months ago 10 notes URL
  Tags la zine fest zines zinesters comics diy


LA Zine Fest Flickr Pool

Got any rad photos you wanna share from LA Zine Fest this year? Add ‘em to our Flickr pool and we might post some of them here!

5 months ago 8 notes URL
  Tags la zine fest zine fests zines zinesters diy


Check out our amazing promo video for LA Zine Fest 2014! We interviewed some of the rad folks that will be tabling this year and asked them about why zines and Zine Fest are so important to them.

We’re into the home stretch now…hope your zines are getting folded and stapled, and that you’re excited for Sunday!

5 months ago 31 notes URL
  Tags la zine fest zines zinesters diy comics los angeles


L.A. Zine Fest is an awesome event that requires tons of setup, so naturally they’ve got some super talented volunteers to take on some of the work. DUM DUM got to ask one of these brave souls, Kenzo Martinez, LA Zinefest Organizer & Volunteer Coordinator, about his experience.
DUM DUM: Do you have a favorite zine?
KENZO MARTINEZ: Right now it’s “Your Illustrated Guide to Becoming One with the Universe” by Yumi Sakugawa, who is also hosting a Zine Week event on the 14th at Giant Robot 2, and tabling at Zine Fest.
DD: How did you get involved with volunteering for Zine Fest?
KM: I was tabling back in 2012 at the first L.A Zine Fest, and at the end of the day I started helping other people clean up. There was a cool installation with leaves and twigs that Walt Gorecki (Homeroom Gallery, Jewcocks) put together, so we cleaned that up for awhile, and that was that.
DD: How many volunteers do you have, and where did they all come from?
KM: We don’t have an exact number, some people can make it to meetings while others are otherwise engaged, but we have about 15 awesome people from Earth, L.A, others from nearby stars but they’re all mostly from our D.I.Y and D.I.T communities. Usually they spring fully formed with powers unimaginable from the womb of creation.
DD: What’s the volunteer party potluck like? What kinds of trouble do you guys get into?
KM: Well, it was a pretty snazzy affair with Maui BBQ chips, eggplant sammiches, quiche and stuff. The nicest people came, the sun stood golden in the sky and we dined al fresco. There was talk of art, poetry, music, logistics and time schedules. It was wonderful, until the fire…we put out the fire and filled out some Google docs.
DD: What’s something Fest goers should look out for?
KM: Each other! The beautiful thing is we’re building a community that already includes you, so look around and hang with the family you never knew you had. Oh, and you know our keynote speaker is Jamie Hernandez of “Love and Rockets” right? He’s one of my all time favorite creators, so you should check that out.
DD: How can we get involved in the awesomeness???
KM: Email me at volunteer@lazinefest.com, I’ll give you some options and then we make it happen. For this year’s Fest, get into a comfortable position, imagine something inspiring, close your eyes, take three slooow deep breaths and say to yourself, “I am already part of a community where I can openly express things I care about” and then show up! Bring a zine you made or some stickers in a backpack and say hello, talk and trade with yer awesome new buddies.
You can find Kenzo at L.A. Zine Fest! DUM DUM would like to add that no zines, pets, people or property were harmed during the volunteer potluck.
by Taylor Yates of DUM DUM Zine

L.A. Zine Fest is an awesome event that requires tons of setup, so naturally they’ve got some super talented volunteers to take on some of the work. DUM DUM got to ask one of these brave souls, Kenzo Martinez, LA Zinefest Organizer & Volunteer Coordinator, about his experience.

DUM DUM: Do you have a favorite zine?

KENZO MARTINEZ: Right now it’s “Your Illustrated Guide to Becoming One with the Universe” by Yumi Sakugawa, who is also hosting a Zine Week event on the 14th at Giant Robot 2, and tabling at Zine Fest.

DD: How did you get involved with volunteering for Zine Fest?

KM: I was tabling back in 2012 at the first L.A Zine Fest, and at the end of the day I started helping other people clean up. There was a cool installation with leaves and twigs that Walt Gorecki (Homeroom Gallery, Jewcocks) put together, so we cleaned that up for awhile, and that was that.

DD: How many volunteers do you have, and where did they all come from?

KM: We don’t have an exact number, some people can make it to meetings while others are otherwise engaged, but we have about 15 awesome people from Earth, L.A, others from nearby stars but they’re all mostly from our D.I.Y and D.I.T communities. Usually they spring fully formed with powers unimaginable from the womb of creation.

DD: What’s the volunteer party potluck like? What kinds of trouble do you guys get into?

KM: Well, it was a pretty snazzy affair with Maui BBQ chips, eggplant sammiches, quiche and stuff. The nicest people came, the sun stood golden in the sky and we dined al fresco. There was talk of art, poetry, music, logistics and time schedules. It was wonderful, until the fire…we put out the fire and filled out some Google docs.

DD: What’s something Fest goers should look out for?

KM: Each other! The beautiful thing is we’re building a community that already includes you, so look around and hang with the family you never knew you had. Oh, and you know our keynote speaker is Jamie Hernandez of “Love and Rockets” right? He’s one of my all time favorite creators, so you should check that out.

DD: How can we get involved in the awesomeness???

KM: Email me at volunteer@lazinefest.com, I’ll give you some options and then we make it happen. For this year’s Fest, get into a comfortable position, imagine something inspiring, close your eyes, take three slooow deep breaths and say to yourself, “I am already part of a community where I can openly express things I care about” and then show up! Bring a zine you made or some stickers in a backpack and say hello, talk and trade with yer awesome new buddies.

You can find Kenzo at L.A. Zine Fest! DUM DUM would like to add that no zines, pets, people or property were harmed during the volunteer potluck.

by Taylor Yates of DUM DUM Zine

5 months ago 14 notes URL
  Tags la zine fest zines zinesters diy dit los angeles diy


youcantrustme:

The third annual LA Zine Fest Reading is just one of the totally fun event filling in the week before the event. LA Zine Week (Feb. 8 to 15) starts with a DUM DUM Zine issue release party and ends with the above reading but there are SO MANY GOOD THINGS in between:
a Valentine’s Day visual reading by six of the city’s BEST comic book artists,
an issue release party for the first zine on Fair Dig Press—Don’t Hide Behind Your Skirt by Aurora Lady,
a reading/release party organized my Tomas Mother-Effing Moniz (Rad Dad zine) and including perfomers, zinesters, writers of the highest caliber at indie book- and zinestore, AndPens Press, 
a house show by two zine bands, Wulfen Rag and Summer Vacation, courtesy of our friends at Razorcake, 
and that’s not all ! 
There are always few more events that sneak in there at the end, so follow the blog or like LA Zine Week on Facebook to be sure you’re clued in to the goings-on. All the events listed above are FREE, by the way. And I hope to see you there!

youcantrustme:

The third annual LA Zine Fest Reading is just one of the totally fun event filling in the week before the event. LA Zine Week (Feb. 8 to 15) starts with a DUM DUM Zine issue release party and ends with the above reading but there are SO MANY GOOD THINGS in between:

  • a Valentine’s Day visual reading by six of the city’s BEST comic book artists,
  • an issue release party for the first zine on Fair Dig Press—Don’t Hide Behind Your Skirt by Aurora Lady,
  • a reading/release party organized my Tomas Mother-Effing Moniz (Rad Dad zine) and including perfomers, zinesters, writers of the highest caliber at indie book- and zinestore, AndPens Press
  • a house show by two zine bands, Wulfen Rag and Summer Vacation, courtesy of our friends at Razorcake, 
  • and that’s not all ! 

There are always few more events that sneak in there at the end, so follow the blog or like LA Zine Week on Facebook to be sure you’re clued in to the goings-on. All the events listed above are FREE, by the way. And I hope to see you there!

5 months ago 34 notes URL
  Tags la zine fest zine reading zines zinesters comix


GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: She’s Not a Morning Person
Describe your work in two sentences or less.
She’s Not a Morning Person zine is a 14 year old perzine about cool things like cats, being Chicana, loving people of all genders, and personal growth.
What are you working on for the Fest this year?
I just put out a poetry issue of SNAMP about queer love, death, and the ocean. I might also have an even newer issue but no promises!!
Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest blog!

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: She’s Not a Morning Person

Describe your work in two sentences or less.

She’s Not a Morning Person zine is a 14 year old perzine about cool things like cats, being Chicana, loving people of all genders, and personal growth.

What are you working on for the Fest this year?

I just put out a poetry issue of SNAMP about queer love, death, and the ocean. I might also have an even newer issue but no promises!!

Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest blog!

5 months ago 15 notes URL
  Tags la zine fest she's not a morning person zines zinesters


GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Awkward Ladies Club
What was your first zine about and when was it made?
My first zine was one of two for San Francisco Zinefest in 2012 called “Never Date Dudes From the Internet.” I was going through an old yahoo mail account and found a folder labeled “craigslist” – I thought it was from when I was looking for apartments when I first moved to California but it turned out to be every email I received when I put out a dating ad in 2005. I put it all together with the original ad I posted – it’s sort of a history of a slightly more innocent period of internet dating.
Describe your most recent zine.
My background is in the biological sciences and I worked in labs for 10 years, mostly with bacteria. The new book I’ll be bringing to LAZF is called “My Favorite Microbes” and is about the (mostly) friendly bugs that live in the world around us: soil bacteria, bacteria that live in volcanoes, bacteria that live inside other bacteria, bacteria in clouds that make ice form.
Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest blog!

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Awkward Ladies Club

What was your first zine about and when was it made?

My first zine was one of two for San Francisco Zinefest in 2012 called “Never Date Dudes From the Internet.” I was going through an old yahoo mail account and found a folder labeled “craigslist” – I thought it was from when I was looking for apartments when I first moved to California but it turned out to be every email I received when I put out a dating ad in 2005. I put it all together with the original ad I posted – it’s sort of a history of a slightly more innocent period of internet dating.

Describe your most recent zine.

My background is in the biological sciences and I worked in labs for 10 years, mostly with bacteria. The new book I’ll be bringing to LAZF is called “My Favorite Microbes” and is about the (mostly) friendly bugs that live in the world around us: soil bacteria, bacteria that live in volcanoes, bacteria that live inside other bacteria, bacteria in clouds that make ice form.

Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest blog!

5 months ago 24 notes URL
  Tags la zine fest awkward ladies club zines zinesters lazf


GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Viva Vox Press & B-Sides Magazine
What was your first zine about and when was it made?
My first zine was a bi-monthly based out of the south bay (Torrance) called, Ad Infinitum Magazine, created in December 2001. It means ‘without end or limits,’ there was no end to how long or short a story was and there was no limits to what topics were included in the zine. Me and my friend Crystal Lafata put it together freshman year of college as a response to our high school journalism teacher who would tell us that our stories were too ‘political’ or ‘outlandish’ for a high school newspaper. We wanted a medium that wasn’t going to be censored, a medium where people could count on getting their stories, beliefs, artwork or ideas published, indefinitely, no matter how crazy they were! We made lots of friends, got to meet people we loved and did lots of cool stuff for the community. Ad Infinitum had a long run…7 years, to be exact. It died in the spring of 2007, along with my heart.
Describe your most recent zine.
I have two new zines out. Both first issues. One is called B-Sides (and other rarities) which is an AZ scene magazine that features local artists and musicians that add life to the vast, thirsty desert that is Tempe, Phoenix and the East valley. There are a lot of talented and colorful people who reside here and I want to tell every single one of their stories!
Second, is a zine called, American Puta. It is a magazine created by women, for women, and about women. It deals with mostly women in power and women empowerment, building sustainable healthy, loving communities and ‘of the earth’ topics. It will also feature women in the arts, basically women who just pretty much KICK MAJOR ASS!
Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest blog!

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Viva Vox Press & B-Sides Magazine

What was your first zine about and when was it made?

My first zine was a bi-monthly based out of the south bay (Torrance) called, Ad Infinitum Magazine, created in December 2001. It means ‘without end or limits,’ there was no end to how long or short a story was and there was no limits to what topics were included in the zine. Me and my friend Crystal Lafata put it together freshman year of college as a response to our high school journalism teacher who would tell us that our stories were too ‘political’ or ‘outlandish’ for a high school newspaper. We wanted a medium that wasn’t going to be censored, a medium where people could count on getting their stories, beliefs, artwork or ideas published, indefinitely, no matter how crazy they were! We made lots of friends, got to meet people we loved and did lots of cool stuff for the community. Ad Infinitum had a long run…7 years, to be exact. It died in the spring of 2007, along with my heart.

Describe your most recent zine.

I have two new zines out. Both first issues. One is called B-Sides (and other rarities) which is an AZ scene magazine that features local artists and musicians that add life to the vast, thirsty desert that is Tempe, Phoenix and the East valley. There are a lot of talented and colorful people who reside here and I want to tell every single one of their stories!

Second, is a zine called, American Puta. It is a magazine created by women, for women, and about women. It deals with mostly women in power and women empowerment, building sustainable healthy, loving communities and ‘of the earth’ topics. It will also feature women in the arts, basically women who just pretty much KICK MAJOR ASS!

Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest blog!

5 months ago 4 notes URL
  Tags viva vox press b-sides magazine zines la zine fest zinesters


GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Kelli Callis
Describe your work in two sentences or less.
I take life-changing events and try and make sense of them through my writing.
Where are your favorite places in your city to look for new zines?
I want to see more zines at Meltdown, the Last Bookstore, and Skylight Books.
What are you working on for the Fest this year?
My last zine was about my traumatic pregnancy, hospitalization, and birth of my son, so this time around, I figured I’d keep the narrative going. It’s about raising my son and the highs and lows of dealing with autism and sensory processing disorder in a semi-judgy suburban environment.
Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest blog!

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Kelli Callis

Describe your work in two sentences or less.

I take life-changing events and try and make sense of them through my writing.

Where are your favorite places in your city to look for new zines?

I want to see more zines at Meltdown, the Last Bookstore, and Skylight Books.

What are you working on for the Fest this year?

My last zine was about my traumatic pregnancy, hospitalization, and birth of my son, so this time around, I figured I’d keep the narrative going. It’s about raising my son and the highs and lows of dealing with autism and sensory processing disorder in a semi-judgy suburban environment.

Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest blog!

5 months ago 2 notes URL
  Tags kell callis la zine fest zinesters that girl zine zines


GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: kkoktu arcade
What was your first zine about and when was it made?
My first was an expressionistic urban rendition of the Persephone myth. I was too embarrassed to turn it into the local comic shop, Comic Relief in Berkeley, so it ended up getting submitted and published in a POC poetry anthology called “smell this”.
Describe your most recent zine.
It’s the beginning of a series, somewhere between an urban fable and speculative fiction. Travelling in Asia or even within my own hoods I’ve heard the most remarkable personal mythologies, I wanted to open a space to retell these stories: slightly recognizable, a tad dystopian, yet with potential for an otherworldly subversion. Right now it’s more visually surreal but I’m hoping for it to gain a stronger narrative boost as the series grows.
Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest blog!

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: kkoktu arcade

What was your first zine about and when was it made?

My first was an expressionistic urban rendition of the Persephone myth. I was too embarrassed to turn it into the local comic shop, Comic Relief in Berkeley, so it ended up getting submitted and published in a POC poetry anthology called “smell this”.

Describe your most recent zine.

It’s the beginning of a series, somewhere between an urban fable and speculative fiction. Travelling in Asia or even within my own hoods I’ve heard the most remarkable personal mythologies, I wanted to open a space to retell these stories: slightly recognizable, a tad dystopian, yet with potential for an otherworldly subversion. Right now it’s more visually surreal but I’m hoping for it to gain a stronger narrative boost as the series grows.

Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest blog!

5 months ago 4 notes URL
  Tags kkoktu arcade kara frame la zine fest zines zinesters


GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: GabyandCo
Describe your most recent zine.
The most recent zine has my drawings of run down urban and industrial buildings I come across while traveling in different cities, mainly of Los Angeles.
Name three of your influences and how they affected your work.
Many artists and things inspire & influence me every day. Street photography and exploring the city influence my work. Zines by other artists such as Nate Orton have influenced me to create my own. Artist, Designer and Photographer Evan Hecox’s illustrations have also inspired my work. Artwork from Artist David Choong Lee, especially a corrugated visual journal I have with 35 of his collage postcards. These artists are only a few of a long list that inspire me. I usually end up buying zines when I visit book stores or book fairs because I love the DIY style and how they’re printed, whether its xeroxed or silkscreened. Their hand-drawn illustrations and hands-on approach is the reason I have always been attracted to zines.
Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest blog!

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: GabyandCo

Describe your most recent zine.

The most recent zine has my drawings of run down urban and industrial buildings I come across while traveling in different cities, mainly of Los Angeles.

Name three of your influences and how they affected your work.

Many artists and things inspire & influence me every day. Street photography and exploring the city influence my work. Zines by other artists such as Nate Orton have influenced me to create my own. Artist, Designer and Photographer Evan Hecox’s illustrations have also inspired my work. Artwork from Artist David Choong Lee, especially a corrugated visual journal I have with 35 of his collage postcards. These artists are only a few of a long list that inspire me. I usually end up buying zines when I visit book stores or book fairs because I love the DIY style and how they’re printed, whether its xeroxed or silkscreened. Their hand-drawn illustrations and hands-on approach is the reason I have always been attracted to zines.

Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest blog!

5 months ago 3 notes URL
  Tags gabyandco la zine fest zines zinesters art zines


GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Melt Brianna
What was your first zine about and when was it made?
My first zine was my “make it yourself-crochet”; a visual guide. I made it for a workshop I was doing at o.c. diy fest in 2009. I still distribute that zine to this day, and i also made the o.c. diy fest zine that was distributed at the fest. I think that was my first experience of mass produced and distributed zines. shout out to santa ana fnb! r.i.p.; many fond memories there.
Describe your most recent zine.

I have two most recent zines that I am going to introduce at LA Zine Fest this year. They are both follow ups to zines I have made in the past. I am making a second edition of “things my friends say”, and i am excited about this one because I have made some new friends that are going to be included, and my old friends are going to reappear. The second zine is going to be a follow up issue to my most recent semi-comical, semi-autobigraphical “Jam Slam” series. It’s going to recap the end of 2013 and introduce 2014 through my world lens.
Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest Blog!

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Melt Brianna

What was your first zine about and when was it made?

My first zine was my “make it yourself-crochet”; a visual guide. I made it for a workshop I was doing at o.c. diy fest in 2009. I still distribute that zine to this day, and i also made the o.c. diy fest zine that was distributed at the fest. I think that was my first experience of mass produced and distributed zines. shout out to santa ana fnb! r.i.p.; many fond memories there.

Describe your most recent zine.

I have two most recent zines that I am going to introduce at LA Zine Fest this year. They are both follow ups to zines I have made in the past. I am making a second edition of “things my friends say”, and i am excited about this one because I have made some new friends that are going to be included, and my old friends are going to reappear. The second zine is going to be a follow up issue to my most recent semi-comical, semi-autobigraphical “Jam Slam” series. It’s going to recap the end of 2013 and introduce 2014 through my world lens.

Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest Blog!

5 months ago 8 notes URL
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