The LA Zine Fest had organized a panel discussion with LA punk pioneer Alice Bag (The Bags, Castration Squad, The Boneheads, Alarma, Cambridge Apostles, Swing Set, Cholita…), Riot Grrrl’s Allison Wolfe (Bratmobile, Partyline, Cool Moms), and filmmaker, Arts Editor for LA Record Drew Denny (also in Bon Bon) at the Moth theater on Sunday night. It was a dream team panel as they had advertised it, since these women had been involved in over 10 bands collectively, and in too many projects to list them here, with activities going from independent film makers, to LadyFest organizers, educators, writers, bloggers, activists, and of course zinemakers…
Ironically, Alice Bag, who describes herself as an agitator and master trouble-maker, modestly said she was inspired by Pussy Riot whereas it is obvious these Russian women were inspired by what started in the US some decades ago, the punk Riot Grrrl movement… And especially, Alice Bag was already performing with a bag over her head in the mid 70s! She explained that this anonymity was very liberating, ‘It was so empowering to have this outlet’, she said, adding that, as a young and poor Chicana, she wasn’t comfortable to express herself in English. She has since published a book in English, ‘Violence Girl’ that she wrote the ‘punk-rock way’, entry after entry as a blogger. At the time, she preferred to connect with people the face hidden behind a bag to escape the stereotypes. As she got older, she definitively embraced her identity as a woman, a Chicana who grew up in East LA. But she insisted they were just having fun at the time, they were not thinking it would make ripples and expand the way the movement did.
Allison Wolfe remembered the pre-internet times, when so much communication was happening without phone and today’s technology, ‘There was more a sense of community than now!’ she added, although she looked amazed of the success of the LA fest, ‘this isIncredible DIY! So much of this is gone from my life, I miss the 90s!’ She explained how the zine culture was important as the ‘scary’ media weren’t speaking to them. By scary she meant she wasn’t happy about the way media were distorting and watering everything down. ‘It [the zines] was an accessible outlet, and I did a zine before starting a band’. They agreed that the same sense of community can now be achieved with social media, but that it isn’t the exact same feeling…


Read the rest of this rad article at Rock NYC!

The LA Zine Fest had organized a panel discussion with LA punk pioneer Alice Bag (The Bags, Castration Squad, The Boneheads, Alarma, Cambridge Apostles, Swing Set, Cholita…), Riot Grrrl’s Allison Wolfe (Bratmobile, Partyline, Cool Moms), and filmmaker, Arts Editor for LA Record Drew Denny (also in Bon Bon) at the Moth theater on Sunday night. It was a dream team panel as they had advertised it, since these women had been involved in over 10 bands collectively, and in too many projects to list them here, with activities going from independent film makers, to LadyFest organizers, educators, writers, bloggers, activists, and of course zinemakers…

Ironically, Alice Bag, who describes herself as an agitator and master trouble-maker, modestly said she was inspired by Pussy Riot whereas it is obvious these Russian women were inspired by what started in the US some decades ago, the punk Riot Grrrl movement… And especially, Alice Bag was already performing with a bag over her head in the mid 70s! She explained that this anonymity was very liberating, ‘It was so empowering to have this outlet’, she said, adding that, as a young and poor Chicana, she wasn’t comfortable to express herself in English. She has since published a book in English, ‘Violence Girl’ that she wrote the ‘punk-rock way’, entry after entry as a blogger. At the time, she preferred to connect with people the face hidden behind a bag to escape the stereotypes. As she got older, she definitively embraced her identity as a woman, a Chicana who grew up in East LA. But she insisted they were just having fun at the time, they were not thinking it would make ripples and expand the way the movement did.

Allison Wolfe remembered the pre-internet times, when so much communication was happening without phone and today’s technology, ‘There was more a sense of community than now!’ she added, although she looked amazed of the success of the LA fest, ‘this isIncredible DIY! So much of this is gone from my life, I miss the 90s!’ She explained how the zine culture was important as the ‘scary’ media weren’t speaking to them. By scary she meant she wasn’t happy about the way media were distorting and watering everything down. ‘It [the zines] was an accessible outlet, and I did a zine before starting a band’. They agreed that the same sense of community can now be achieved with social media, but that it isn’t the exact same feeling…

Read the rest of this rad article at Rock NYC!

1 year ago 20 notes URL
  Tags lazf la zine fest riot grrrl alice bag allison wolfe drew denny punk feminism zines zine fest


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